To win, change small and change often

If you want to progress, do not follow a person who posts having run 25 kilometres once a week. Follow the one who runs two km daily. Exceptional progress and change management are from small steps that are done consistently, not grand results that are one-off.

Winners focus on the principle of small steps make the tremendous transformation. If you are just starting, it is easy to run two kilometres. And once you show up daily, you will soon see progress. However, running 25 km once a week may look fantastic. But not an easy foot to make. The chances of doing it once and giving up later are high.

Change small and change often.

Look at babies. They start small but keep changing daily. Before you know it, they are very strong and active.

If you want to lose weight, do not set out to start running 25 kilometres on day one. You will not make any progress. Start by walking one kilometre. Then try running and walking 1 and ½ a kilometre. Then run the kilometre none stop.  Show up daily and do something.

The secret is in the habit of doing it daily without giving up. It is good to run 25 kilometres. Only after you can consistently do 5 kilometres daily. Tremendous progress is achieved when you change small, and often.

That is the secret of my progress in whatever I do.

Copyright Mustapha B Mugisa, Mr Strategy. All rights reserved.

 

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